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For 3 Years, SOCAP has had a #LandAcknowledgment in Yelamu – Ramaytush Ohlone Territory. Kanyon CoyoteWoman Sayers-Roods has opened up this space as a reminder that we are on Occupied Native Land – and why it is important to #HonorNativeLand

https://socialcapitalmarkets.net/2019/10/indigenous-socap19/

Seeding Sovereignty Helped Make the

INDIGENOUS LOUNGE A REALITY

https://seedingsovereignty.org/indigenoussocap19?

The Vision of the Indigenous@SOCAP19 Track was Built on 10 Ideas:

  1. Invest in Indigenous nation-building through regenerative energy projects like wind and solar.
  2. Expand Indigenous land stewardship models like food sovereignty and hemp initiatives to address environmental crises like water scarcity.
  3. Create an Indigenous scholarship fund to break the poverty cycle and the green job barrier.
  4. Develop a regenerative investment management strategy in consultation with Indigenous elders and with collaboration from financial industry experts.
  5. Amplify Indigenous narratives by investing in Indigenous journalism and media 
  6. Implement sustainable development pilot projects in the face of a changing climate (e.g. Alaska village relocation).
  7. Increase awareness of violence to women, children, and two spirits that parallels the violence to the planet and amplify opportunities for matriarchal leadership in entrepreneurial systems.
  8. Amplify applications of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples into the corporate world to realize sustainable development goals.
  9. In recognition of the fact that 95% of 60 billion dollars of foundation funding in the US is allocated to white-led organizations, we are advocating for an allocation of 10% of global philanthropy go to global Indigenous Peoples.
  10. Overall, build Indigenous sovereignty and self-determination through regenerative economic development by supporting all of the above.

Listen to Wednesdays (October 23rd 2019) Panel discussion

Art for Resistance and Economic Change 

Wed Oct 23      1:00-2:15, Room: TBA

Indigenous Peoples have a long history of resisting colonial capitalism using art as an extension of their culture. Art is a critical method of communication that sheds light on economic disparity, environmental destruction and climate change. The artists on this panel have been tasked to beautify, clarify and uplift their tribal nation’s struggles. With their amazing talents, they are reclaiming their lands, protecting their people and inevitably working towards economic change.

Kanyon “CoyoteWoman “Sayers-Roods / Ohlone Mutsun and Chumash / Kanyon Konsulting LLC

Ras K’dee, Afro-Pomo / Audiopharmacy and The Nest

Remy / Diné (Navajo) / First Seven Design Labs

From SeedingSovereignty

As we stand on the precipice of the climate crisis, it is vital that we turn to Indigenous Nations around the world for guidance on how to move forward. Traditional ecological knowledge, Indigenous cosmologies, and societal structures can help stop the self-destructive model of colonial-capitalism. Indigenous land stewards currently safeguard 80% of the world’s biodiversity, which is an amazing feat considering the effects of colonization and genocide that have plagued the world. The global market economy cannot continue to buckle under the pressures of colonial-capitalism and must take brave leaps to decolonize the world’s ecological and socio-economic trajectory by investing in a way forward that can turn the tide on the climate crisis and social injustice. 

David Suzuki says it, Noam Chomsky, says it, the Drawdown Team says it, and most importantly, our ancestors said it–Indigenous Peoples have answers. The most effective social impact strategies are ones that Indigenize the world. 

Indigenous@SOCAP19 Panels

From the Tar Sands to the Borderlands: Bringing Solar Energy to Indigenous Migrant Housing

Wed Oct 22      8:30-9:45, Room: C 235

At this time of escalating threats at the US-Mexico border, an opportunity to make a measurable impact for asylum seeking Indigenous families has arisen. This session highlights a partnership between Sacred Earth Solar (in the Canadian tar sands and Cree led), Tonatierra (a Phoenix based cultural embassy of Indigenous Peoples), and Seeding Sovereignty (an Indigenous womxn-led collective) as they share their story about providing renewable energy to an Indigenous Migrant community and beyond.  

Christine Nobiss, Plains Cree-Saulteaux / Seeding Sovereignty

Tupac Enrique Acosta, Izkaloteka / Tonatierra

Eryn Wise, Jicarilla Apache & Laguna Pueblo / Seeding Sovereignty

 Funding Indigenous Political Engagement to Respond to the Climate Crisis

Thurs Oct 24     11:30-12:45, Room: C 210

Indigenous Peoples have long spoken of the repercussions of colonial-capitalism, the root cause of institutionalized racism, misogyny, environmental collapse and more. With the climate crisis unfolding there has never been a more crucial time to fund Indigenous political engagement efforts. Participants will receive a brief history on Indigenous political grassroots organizing and current GOTV efforts, PACs, campaigns, etc–all to dismantle colonial institutions and replace them with Indigenous practices that work in synchronicity with the land.

Christine Nobiss, Plains Cree-Saulteaux / Seeding Sovereignty

Mahrinah von Schlegel, Tewa / Digital Future PAC

Mellor Willie, Navajo / 7Gen Leaders

Economic Development and an Indigenous Led Regenerative Economy

Fri Oct 25          10:15-11:15, Room: BATS! Theater

Indigenous world views are essential to transforming the economy beyond sustainable to regenerative. Incorporating Indigenous ideologies and practices into corporate and political realms offers a pathway towards building a more regenerative economy. Come hear examples of economic development and long-term, low cost capital provided to Native communities nationwide building small businesses, private sector economies and increasing generational wealth.

Alexis Bunten, Unangan (Aleut) and Yup’ik / Bioneers 

Chrystel Cornelius, Ojibwa-Oneida / Oweesta Corporation

Elizabeth Gamboa, Mexica-Apache / New Mexico Community Capital

Indigenous Values, Technology and Social Innovation

Wed Oct 23      10:00-11:15, Room: C 235

Many First Nations are challenged by a lack of clean water, electricity, internet access, electoral technology, employment opportunities, etc. Indigenous Peoples are building culturally sensitive tech to close these gaps and improve the quality of life for their tribal members. They are creating alternative energy solutions, green job training, voting apps and more, which are strengthening local economies and also creating a more just and regenerative world market.  

Donna Morton / Lumen Farm 

Lawrence Lewis, We Wai Kai / Onefeather

Elsa Johnson, Diné (Navajo)  / IINA Solutions

Art for Resistance and Economic Change 

Wed Oct 23      1:00-2:15, Room: TBA

Indigenous Peoples have a long history of resisting colonial capitalism using art as an extension of their culture. Art is a critical method of communication that sheds light on economic disparity, environmental destruction and climate change. The artists on this panel have been tasked to beautify, clarify and uplift their tribal nation’s struggles. With their amazing talents, they are reclaiming their lands, protecting their people and inevitably working towards economic change.

Kanyon “CoyoteWoman “Sayers-Roods / Ohlone Mutsun and Chumash / Kanyon Konsulting LLC

Ras K’dee, Afro-Pomo / Audiopharmacy and The Nest

Remy / Diné (Navajo) / First Seven Design Labs

SOCAP and Indigenous Community


Indigenous Communities

Indigenous Peoples constitute the largest minority in the world at almost 5% of the global population, and their traditions offer valuable wisdom on environmental stewardship, health, community, and more. However, investment into indigenous communities can be misunderstood and difficult to access, and requires nuanced cultural understanding. Welcoming leaders of indigenous finance and entrepreneurship will add ancient insight and new opportunities to this year’s conversation.

Post Author: Kanyon Coyote

Activist, artist, educator – an Indigenous Generalized Specialist

I am Ohlone & Chumash - California Native Woman. I am a creative artist ever inspired by nature and the natural world, Catalyst of decolonizing conversations. Contemp/Traditional Artist, Native Representative, Consultant, Advocate of Truth in History, Multimedia Artist, "Coyote", T.E.K educator, and much more - Let’s Talk

CEO of Kanyon Konsulting
Founder of Indian Canyon Two-Spirit Society

Cultural Director and COO of Costanoan Indian Research

Cultural Representative and Native Monitor for Indian Canyon Mutsun Band of Costanoan Ohlone People

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